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Delaware Youth : Developmental Assets : Types of assets

Types of assets

EXTERNAL ASSETS:
The first 20 assets focus on positive experiences that children and young people receive from the people and socializing systems in their everyday lives. When these assets are provided by the formal and informal systems in a community, they stimulate and nurture positive development in youth. There are four categories of external assets:

1.  Support
This area refers to the way young people experience love, affirmation, and acceptance. Ideally, young people experience an abundance of support not only in their families but also from many other people in the community, such as neighbors, teachers, and other significant adults.
 
2.  Empowerment
These assets relate to the key development need for youth to be valued and valuable. The empowerment assets highlight this need, focusing on community perceptions of youth (as reported by youth), and opportunities for youth to contribute to society in meaningful ways.

3.  Boundaries and Expectations
The assets in this category refer to the need for youth to have clear and enforced boundaries to complement support and empowerment. Ideally, boundary assets are experienced in the settings of family, school, and neighbor- hood, providing a set of consistent messages about behavior which is viewed as "in bounds" and "out of bounds" across socializing systems.

4.  Constructive Use of Time
One of the prime characteristics of a healthy community for youth is a rich array of structured opportunities for children and adolescents. Whether through schools, community organizations, faith communities, city/county government programs, or at home these structured activities contribute to the development of many internal and external assets

INTERNAL ASSETS:
The 20 internal assets are those things a community and family nurture within children and youth so they can contribute to their own development. These assets guide the choices and create a sense of centeredness, purpose and focus for young people. There are four categories of internal assets:

1.  Commitment to Learning

Commitment to Learning is essential to young people in today's changing world. Developing an internal intellectual curiosity and the skills to gain new knowledge and learn from experience enables youth to succeed in school and to prepare to join the workforce that must adapt to rapid change. 

 

2.  Positive Values

Positive Values are important "external compasses" to guide young people's priorities and choices. Though there are many values that seek to nurture, the asset framework focuses on six values known to both help prevent high risk behaviors and promote caring for others. 

 

3.  Social Competencies

Social Competencies reflect the important personal skills young people need to negotiate through the maze of choices and options they face on a daily basis. These skills also lay a foundation for independence and competence as young adults. 

 

4.  Positive Identity

Positive Identity assets focus on young people's view of themselves - their own sense of power, purpose, worth and promise. Without these assets, young people risk feeling powerless and without a sense of initiative and purpose.

 

 



The 20 internal assets are those things a community and family nurture within children and youth so they can contribute to their own development. These assets guide the choices and create a sense of centeredness, purpose and focus for young people. There are four categories of internal assets



Delaware Youth : Developmental Assets : Types of assets


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